What is the Face Value of Life Insurance? – Bankrate.com

April 15, 2022 By admin

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We are an independent, advertising-supported comparison service. Our goal is to help you make smarter financial decisions by providing you with interactive tools and financial calculators, publishing original and objective content, by enabling you to conduct research and compare information for free – so that you can make financial decisions with confidence.
Bankrate has partnerships with issuers including, but not limited to, American Express, Bank of America, Capital One, Chase, Citi and Discover.
The offers that appear on this site are from companies that compensate us. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site, including, for example, the order in which they may appear within the listing categories. But this compensation does not influence the information we publish, or the reviews that you see on this site. We do not include the universe of companies or financial offers that may be available to you.
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When you’re buying life insurance, you might feel like you need a glossary just to even start the process. Even the best life insurance companies use industry lingo that can make buying a policy feel overly confusing.
As you’re shopping for coverage, for example, you might be wondering, what is the face amount of life insurance? Also called face value, the face amount of your insurance policy is arguably the most important component of your coverage. So it’s pretty critical that you understand what face value means, and can differentiate between face amount vs. cash value.
In short, your face value is the amount of money your beneficiaries will receive from your insurance company at the time of your death. You might hear it called your death benefit, coverage amount or face amount. So when you buy life insurance, this is what you’re paying for.
So what is the face amount of the life insurance policy you have? If you haven’t used any of your cash value (more on that in a minute), you don’t need to do any calculations to find out.
Your policy benefits should list your face value as a specific sum. If you’re not sure about the face amount of your policy, read it through. The face value should be easy to find, but if you have any trouble, call your insurer. If you’re paying for a life insurance policy, you definitely want to know the amount of money your loved ones will get when you pass away.
We mentioned that using your policy’s cash value can impact your face value. The life insurance face value vs. cash value conversation can feel a little confusing, especially since these two policy components are so similarly named. But you should know that these are two separate things.
Let’s look at the face amount vs. cash value. The face value/face amount is, as we’ve said, your death benefit. It’s the amount of money you picked for your beneficiaries to get when you bought your policy. It’s (generally) a fixed number.
If you bought a permanent life insurance policy, your coverage may also come with a cash value component. This is completely separate from your face value. When you pay your premiums, your insurance provider puts some of that money into a separate account for you. That money might earn a steady rate of interest or get invested, depending on the type of policy you chose.
Your cash value can be useful to you in a few ways, including:
Now that you know the difference between the face value and cash value of your life insurance policy, you’re ready to make an informed decision about the right face value for you.
You might think you want to get a policy with a huge face value, but you should know that the higher your policy’s face amount, the more you’ll pay for it.
So, really, picking the right face value comes down to balancing your loved ones’ future needs against your budget right now.
Plus, insurers will generally cap your face value at a certain amount based on things like your age and your salary. A 20- or 30-year-old might be able to get a policy with a face value that’s roughly 50 times their salary right now, for example, while a 60-year-old might only be able to get a face amount worth ten times their current salary. That’s because insurers assume younger people will live longer, meaning the insurance company can make more money off their premiums to cover that face amount.
Ultimately, the right face value for you will depend on things like:
To help you figure out the right level of face amount insurance coverage for your needs, we have a starter guide and a calculator.
Generally, your policy’s face amount doesn’t change. You pick that number when you buy your policy and it stays at that level until you pass away, at which point your beneficiaries get that amount of money. In fact, that’s one of the key differentiators between life insurance face value vs. cash value.
But that said, there are a few things that can alter your face amount, so let’s look at them.
A rider (also called an endorsement) is additional coverage you add to your life insurance policy. And some riders allow you to tap into your face value while you’re living.
For example, you might choose to add a terminal illness rider. That way, if you’re diagnosed with a terminal illness, you can use some of your death benefit for medical care while you’re alive.
But any money you use while you’re living will get subtracted from your face value amount, lessening the benefit your loved ones receive when you pass away.
Technically, this doesn’t affect your face value, but it does impact the overall worth of your policy, so it’s worth mentioning.
As your cash value grows, you might feel like your policy is getting more valuable. But remember that there are major differences between the face value and the cash value.
Specifically, it’s important to know that when you die, your insurance provider absorbs the remainder of your cash value unless you have a rider that specifically calls for it to get added to your death benefit (i.e., handed over to your beneficiaries). These riders are rare, so it’s best to assume cash value growth won’t affect your face amount insurance coverage.
As we’ve mentioned before, if you have a policy with a cash value component, you can probably borrow against it for a low-interest loan. But if you don’t pay that money back, your insurance company will subtract your outstanding loan amount from your face value at the time of your death.
When your insurer agrees to pay the face amount to your beneficiaries, they do so under the assumption that you will pass away as the result of an unforeseeable cause. If you lie on your application (e.g., you don’t disclose a preexisting condition) or you commit suicide, you violate the agreement with your insurer. At that point, they may void your policy — which effectively brings your face value down to zero, leaving your loved ones empty-handed.
The higher your face amount, the higher your premiums. As you’re choosing the face amount of your life insurance policy, get quotes for premiums to make sure your budget can accommodate them.
That depends. Your age, your family’s needs, your health and other factors impact your life insurance needs — and the best company to meet them.
But some life insurance companies offer better products and services than others. To help you compare some of the leading providers, we’ve compiled a list of the best life insurance companies.
You can call your insurance provider and ask. In some cases — for example, if your salary has significantly increased since you bought your coverage — they may be willing to adjust your policy. But this might require an entirely new underwriting process, meaning you might need to get a medical exam again. And your premiums will go up, too.
If your insurer won’t increase your face value and you want more coverage for your loved ones, you can also purchase a separate, additional life insurance policy.
Bankrate.com is an independent, advertising-supported publisher and comparison service. Bankrate is compensated in exchange for featured placement of sponsored products and services, or your clicking on links posted on this website. This compensation may impact how, where and in what order products appear. Bankrate.com does not include all companies or all available products.
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